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Teledyne Hastings Instruments Blog

Fundamentals Vacuum and Mass Flow Technology

Posted by Doug Baker on Wed, Jun 22, 2016 @ 10:27 AM

One of the goals of these blog postings is to give readers knowledge about vacuum and mass flow technology. The Society of Vacuum Coaters has established a foundation (SVCF) with a similar goal. Dr. Don McClure (Acuity Consulting & Training) has created “The Vacuum Wizard Video”. Dr. McClure worked at both IBM & 3M and has been teaching for over 20 years about vacuum coating onto flexible substrates.

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As stated on the SVCF website, “The Vacuum Wizard Video brings to life the fundamentals of vacuum and vacuum coating technology through an informal and thought provoking presentation using non-technical jargon and filled with live demonstrations.

The Vacuum Wizard Video seeks to raise awareness of students and educators about the fascinating world of vacuum and vacuum coating technology. The only prerequisite is a curiosity about this amazing technology.

The Vacuum Wizard Video can be a useful training tool in the corporate world for personnel who require a basic understanding of vacuum technology. Sales representatives, customer service personnel, field service and maintenance technicians, lab technicians, and engineers with no vacuum technology background, can all benefit from the Vacuum Wizard Video.”

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(Check out the Teledyne Hastings’ Vacuum Model 2002 Vacuum Gauge on the table)  Click the button below to request an evaluation sample of the 2002 Vacuum Gauge

 Request evaluation sample for HPM 2002

You can get more information about the SVC Foundation and the video series by visiting:

http://svcfoundation.org

Click to see a sample of the Vacuum Wizard Video 

 

Tags: Mass Flow, vacuum gauges

FAQ Corner - Units for Vacuum Measurement

Posted by Doug Baker on Mon, Sep 22, 2014 @ 04:23 PM

Earlier this year, the applications engineers here at Teledyne Hastings discussed topics for our blog. We all agreed that one of the more frequent questions that we discuss with folks involve the units used to measure vacuum levels. We find the technicians who use their vacuum systems daily often seem to develop a sixth sense about the “health” of their systems. They know something isn’t quite right when the base pressure (or rate of pressure change) is not what they expect. So when pressure measurements are not consistent from batch to batch, that is the time when the user stops to ask the meaning behind the data that their vacuum measurement instrumentation is providing.

Now, most users know that vacuum is commonly measured using units of pressure. There are a few different sets of pressure units and this blog will discuss the more commonly used ones. In Armand Berman’s book, Total Pressure Measurements in Vacuum Technology, pressure unit systems are divided into two categories: “Coherent Systems” and “Other Systems”.

Coherent Systems of Units are based on the definition of pressure (P) as the force (F) exerted on a chamber wall per unit area (A). P = F/A.  The International System of Units, or SI units, is commonly used for pressure measurement. http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/units.html  The SI unit for pressure is the Pascal (Pa). It interesting to note that at NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology), published papers are always required to use the SI set of units. Again, the SI unit for pressure (force per unit area) is the Pascal. 1 Pa = 1 N /m2.

Now, the Pascal as a unit of pressure is not always the most convenient because vacuum systems are often operating in a range of pressures where we would need to collect data using large numbers. For example, near atmospheric pressure, we would measure approximately 100,000 Pa. So a more convenient unit, the bar, has been derived. (1 bar = 100,000 Pa)

Moving lower in pressure, it is very helpful to then use the mbar (1 mbar = 0.001 bar). So many vacuum users, especially in Europe, use the mbar as the basis for describing pressure levels. As a specific example, look at the base pressure specification of a turbo pump, it will be given in terms of mbar (e.g. Base Pressure < 1 x 10-10 mbar).

Another system of pressure units is based on the Torricelli experiment (shown in the diagram). In this experiment, the pressure exerted on the mercury can be shown to be P = hdg, where h is the height of the mercury column, d is the density, and g is the acceleration due to gravity.

 

Simple Barometer
 

 

By measuring the mercury column height, the user can determine the pressure. The Torr unit (named for the Italian scientist Torricelli) has been defined to be 1 millimeter of mercury (1 Torr = 1 mmHg). This unit is very common, especially in the United States. It is also common to use the mTorr (1 mTorr = 0.001 Torr). Many years ago, pressure was sometimes described in terms of “microns”, which simply meant a mercury column height of one micron (1x10-6 m). Note that the micron and the mTorr are the same.

One last word about the units used to measure vacuum: on occasion, there is confusion between pressure units. As we have seen above, the mbar and the mTorr are not the same. One mbar has the same order of magnitude as one Torr  (1 mbar ≈ 0.75 Torr).  The table below gives some approximate conversion values. A useful website for conversions:

 http://www.onlineconversion.com/pressure.htm

 

 

Pa

mbar

Torr

mTorr (micron)

Atm

1 Pa =

1

0.01

0.0075

7.50

~ 10-5

1 mbar =

100

1

0.75

750.06

~ 10-3

1 Torr =

133.3

1.333

1

1000.0

~ 10-3

1 mTorr (micron) =

0.1333

0.00133

0.001

1

~ 10-6

1 Atm =

101,325

1013.25

760

760,000

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

Douglas Baker is the Director of Sales & Business Development of Teledyne Hastings. Antonio Araiza prepared the Torricelli experiment drawing. Antonio is the head of Technical Documentation at Teledyne Hastings (and is among the best soccer referees in the Commonwealth of Virginia).

Tags: Teledyne Hastings Instruments, pressure, mTorr, mBar, micron, pascal, torr, vacuum pressure, units of measurement, vacuum gauges, vacuum meters, vacuum controllers